Rastafari - Belief System

Discussion dans 'Actualités de l'Ile Maurice' créé par Rafic Soormally, 13 Déc 2013.

  1. Rastafari - Belief System

    Rastas want people of African origin to recognise their African identity which has been undermined by Babylon, which they see as corrupt, materialistic and greedy. There is ample evidence to show that most of the Rastas in Mauritius are descendants of slaves.

    [​IMG]
    Emperor Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia​

    Popular in Jamaica and Ethiopia, the core belief in Rastafari is that Black People descend from Israelites and were banished because they transgressed against God. They believe that their salvation came through their saviour Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I, a reincarnation of Jesus Christ. They refer to this saviour as « Jah », which is the Biblical name of God, from Jahweh or Jehovah (Psalms 68:4, Bible - Kings James Version). Ahmadis have a similar belief in the Indian Mirza Ghulam Ahmad who proclaimed himself to be the Second Coming and a Messiah all in one. The beliefs of Rastas are far-reaching and encompass every aspect of human life ranging from tolerance and peace to law and politics. Belief in the teachings of Emperor Hailey Sellassie I springs from the teachings of Judaism and Christianity. Although Rastas do not call themselves Jewish or Christians, they do claim to have Jewish roots and much of Rastafari symbolism is rooted in Judaism.

    Rastafari does not boil down to the smoking of cannabis and wearing dreadlocks by Rastas as some people appear to make out. Unfortunately, many ‘Historians’ are trying to revise history in order to lead a political campaign against Rastas and their beliefs. The main problem in the Rastarafian belief is the Rastas’ interpretation of the Holy Bible to the effect that it requires Rastas, as a spiritual act, to smoke cannabis, also called marijuana, ganja, weed, herb, and by several other names. They argue that the Holy Bible was incorrectly translated from its Aramaic roots and that it contains many mistakes.

    Babylon v/s Zion
    Rastas are afro-centric, and they want people of African origin to recognise their African identity which has been undermined by Babylon (the White Man’s society), which they consider as evil and which committed unspeakable acts of aggression against the African people. The belief in the repatriation of Rastas does not mean a physical migration to Africa but a spiritual one. Rastas are required to live according to the laws of nature, which Rastas believe is the African way. They believe that Zion, which means Africa (particularly Ethiopia) is their promised land, the land Jah (Jehovah) promised to them.

    Dreadlocks and the Lion of Judah
    The growing of dreadlocks by Rastas is also inspired from the Bible. « Dreads symbolise the mane of the Lion of Judah [Bible’s Book of Genesis] and the Rasta rebellion against Babylon », and is a means to assert their identity. In Judaism, the lion symbolises the Tribe of Judah. The lion is also on the Rastafarian flag. But not all Rastas grow dreadlocks. As a people, Rastas have the right to wear dreadlocks and there have been court judgments in the USA against institutions who discriminated against the dreadlocks of Rastas. Dreadlocks have also become fashionable amongst white men and women, but a White European can never become a Rasta.

    Reggae and Seggae
    [​IMG]

    Reggae music, which has been vulgarised by Jamaican singer Bob Marley in the 1970’s, forms an integral part of the lifestyle of Rastas. It gives them empowerment and the opportunity to openly thank Jah for what he has given in the present life. Rastas also believe in afterlife. In Mauritius, Mauritian sega singers have mixed their music with reggae and called it seggae. For information, sega is a Swahili term which means « the rolling up of one’s sleeves and trousers ». The Swahili civilisation was a coastal civilisation, and Swahili itself means « Coastal ».


    There are over 100,000 Rastas in Jamaica, with sizeable communities in the UK, the US and the Caribbean. There are also minority communities of Rastas in Mauritius, even in Russia. Although ruffians exist in every community, Rastas are essentially a docile, tolerant and law-abiding people. The reason why many Rastas end up in prison is because they are caught smoking marijuana, an illegal substance, which they say is part of their ‘religion’, which many say is more of a way of life. Several people believe that some Rastas have themselves misinterpreted the Bible since the contemporary use of the terms ‘weed’ or ‘grass’ or ‘seed’ or ‘herb’ to denote cannabis or marijuana are not what is referred to in the Holy Bible (Genesis 1:11, 1:29, Proverbs 15:17, Psalms 104:14). « Thou shalt eat the herb of the field » Genesis 3:18. Why does the « herb » in the Bible not mean thyme, parsley, coriander or dill?

    A descendant of slave can be a Rasta
    While Historian Benjamin Mootoo recognises a ‘Creole community’ which, incidentally, he is still unable to define properly, he appears to deny the existence of a Rasta community when he says that there is no true Rasta in Mauritius (« Aucun vrai rasta à Maurice », Defi 5 December 2013). He said that « No rasta in Mauritius can be said to have originated in this movement » and states that : « They had made a series of claims, but their case was not included in the report because we concluded that Rastafarianism has nothing to do with slavery. Therefore they could not be taken into consideration ».

    Can Benjamin Mootoo explain to people what a ‘vrai créole’ (‘true Creole’) is? Where do Creoles originate from? Since a Creole is a European (Spanish/Portuguese) term to describe a White man born in a then slave colony like Reunion, Martinique, Ile de France (now Mauritius), it can be said that a Creole originates from Europe. But if a person’s origin is African or Indian, he originates from Africa or India. Therefore, how does a descendant of African slave become a Creole, creole being a European term?

    In an interview published in l’Express of 2nd December 2013, in reply to the question « Why does one become a Rasta? », José Rose replied : « To embark on resistance. To find one’s ancestral culture. To become rasta is to fight against the acculturation inherited from the colonial system. It is a response to humiliation, uprooting and loss of identity. It is refusing indoctrination by Christian churches, accomplices of slavery. It is knowing that God is black. All this has to do with becoming a Rasta. And there, Jah calls you ». Mr Rose also said that when he was a Catholic, he did accept that Jesus Christ was White.

    [​IMG]
    José Rose​

    A descendant of slave can be a Rasta, a Catholic, a Muslim, a Hindu, an Ahmadi, an Atheist, and so on. No one has the right to deny the rights of Rastas to live in a community. Like the Ahmadi sect, it cannot be denied that Rastafari is a way of life and a sect. Any such denial is clearly a form of discrimination. For someone (Benjamin Moutou) who sat on the panel of the Truth and Justice Commission, rejecting the claims of Rastas in toto was totally misguided, wrong and unjust. There is ample evidence to show that most of the Rastas in Mauritius are descendants of slaves. While, rather than seeking JUSTICE, Benjamin Moutou is asking for descendants of slaves to « FORGIVE » the white racists for their crimes against humanity, Jamaican Rasta Priest Trevor Stewart said « the Bobo Shanti Order, also known as the Ethiopia Africa Black Congress Church of Divine Salvation, delivered a detailed document to the United Nations years ago, seeking reparation for the descendants of enslaved Africans in Jamaica » (The Gleaner, August 7, 2013).

    Moreover, Benjamin Moutou’s use of the objectionable term « rastafarisme » shows how much he really knows on the subject. Rastas detest “isms” like ‘Rastafarianism’. Mahatma Gandhi also disliked ‘isms’ like ‘Gandhism’. They say that those are European decadent inventions. Rastas call their belief Rastafari. The media should stop using the term ‘rastafarianism’ because it is very misleading indeed and offensive to Rastas.

    Linda Aïnouche’s ‘incitement’
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    Linda Aïnouche​

    In an interview published in the Défi of 8 December 2013, it is disappointing that French anthropologist Linda Aïnouche misinforms Mauritians by making a spurious correlation between Sadhus (Hindu Saints) and Rastas (followers of Haile Selassie), arguing that Sadhus influenced Rastas and their ideas. A Sadhu’s jata (dreadlocks) have nothing to do with mane of the Lion of Judah. Linda Aïnouche is clearly making a political statement because the majority of Mauritians are Hindus, and interfering in the internal affairs of Mauritius in the process. Hindus are not campaigning for the legalisation of any illegal drug. Mauritians should reject her allegations and speculations and hold her liable for incitement against Sadhus (and Sadhvis), and Hindus generally. She did not speak about the Rastas belief system emanating from their interpretation of the Holy Scriptures. When she says that Rastafari is « neither a religion nor a sect », she contradicts the Rasta José Rose and clearly does not know what she is talking about.


    M Rafic Soormally
    London
    8 December 2013
     
  2. boispignolet

    boispignolet Membre

    Le guide rasta Rafic Soormally

    Est-ce une tare d’être descendant d’esclave, car à vous lire on le dirait ?

    Que les rastas modifient la bible ou soient de descendance juive, je m’en tamponne le coquillard.

    Eh ! Rafic, vous n’allez pas nous refaire l’histoire ! Les lecteurs de ce forum ne sont pas des ignorants et savent pertinemment où trouver la bonne information.

    Ils n’ont pas besoin d’être guidés ou orientés par un menteur doublé d’un affabulateur raciste.

    Les lecteurs, en lisant votre insignifiante prose, vont vite s’apercevoir où vous voulez en venir.
    Vous faites encore du triage dans ce post, seriez-vous un descendant de waffen-SS ?
    Un Dieu noir, blanc et pourquoi pas multicolore ?

    Maintenant, Rafic se déclare porte-parole des rastas : :D:D
    Vous avez écrit : « Moreover, Benjamin Moutou’s use of the objectionable term « rastafarisme » shows how much he really knows on the subject. »

    Comme c’est bizarre Rafic, vous qui encensez le dictionnaire Larousse, aujourd’hui vous écrivez que Benjamin Moutou insulte les rastafaris en employant le mot inacceptable rastafarisme.

    Pourtant, ce mot figure bien dans le Larousse et ce n’est pas une insulte, la preuve :
    http://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais/rastafarisme/66599

    Je profite de ce moment d’extase pour renouveler la question que je vous ai posée il y a quelques mois :

    Vous aviez cité le Petit Larousse au sujet du mot patois : « Patois des nègres aux colonies, formé de mots français vieillis ou défigurés et de mots empruntés un peu à toutes les langues étrangères. »

    Je vous demande encore une fois de me communiquer les références de ce Larousse où il y a le mot nègre.

    Rafic est également plus instruit qu’une anthropologue chevronnée, mais :
    http://www.davibejamaica.com/actualites/medias/6155-dreadlocks-story-un-documentaire-propose-par-linda-ainouche.html

    Encore les mêmes saynètes réchauffées interprétées par le comédien raté Rafic Soormally.
     
  3. Linda Aïnouche - Keep out of the internal political affairs of Mauritius!

    Linda Aïnouche should Keep out of the internal political affairs of Mauritius!

    Instead of sticking her dirty nose in the internal political affairs of Mauritius, French anthropologist Linda Aïnouche should rather answer the question :

    << How does a descendant of African slave become a Creole, creole being a European term? >>

    In France, laws are passed to force people to believe in Zionist lies and propaganda. Mauritius is not France. We are mainly of Indian and African origins and we do not take crap from anyone.

    She should answer the anthropological question put to her.

    M.R.S.
     
  4. Should Mauritians start worshiping Benjamin Moutou?

    Should Mauritians start worshiping Benjamin Moutou?


    European slavery of Black Africans - Benjamin Moutou : «Il faut pardonner et oublier»

    Benjamin Moutou seems to be a disciple of Nelson Mandela as he too wants others to forgive crimes against Black Africans.

    One would have thought that forgiveness is a personal act relating to harm done by others, in this case by white racists, to oneself or one's ancestors.

    But when Benjamin Moutou leads a political campaign, not to seek Justice as he was paid to do through Taxpayers' money as a member of the Truth and Justice Commission, to demand forgiveness from others, may be he takes himself for a Messiah and a Saint too!

    Should Mauritians start worshiping Benjamin Moutou?

    M.R.S.
     
  5. boispignolet

    boispignolet Membre

    Rafic a écrit : « Instead of sticking her dirty nose in the internal political affairs of Mauritius, French anthropologist Linda Aïnouche should rather answer the question : »

    Je pense que son nez propre auparavant est ressorti sale des affaires politiques intérieures de Maurice.

    Rafic a écrit : « << How does a descendant of African slave become a Creole, creole being a European term? >>

    Vous l’avez déjà expliqué. :rolleyes:

    Rafic a écrit : « In France, laws are passed to force people to believe in Zionist lies and propaganda. »

    Sur ce forum, on se méfie de la propagande et des mensonges trop outranciers antisionistes.


    Rafic a écrit : « …we do not take crap from anyone. »
    Exactement comme moi avec vos posts. :mrgreen:
     
  6. boispignolet

    boispignolet Membre

    Rafic a écrit : «Should Mauritians start worshiping Benjamin Moutou ? »

    Les Mauriciens n’ont pas besoin d’un Rafic pour les guider.

    Rafic a écrit : «Benjamin Moutou seems to be a disciple of Nelson Mandela as he too wants others to forgive crimes against Black Africans»
    .


    «One would have thought that forgiveness is a personal act relating to harm done by others, in this case by white racists, to oneself or one's ancestors»



    Rafic, vous caquetez comme une poule qui cherche un endroit pour pondre son œuf ! :mrgreen:
    Que proposez-vous comme alternative au pardon dans le cas de l’esclavage ?
    Je vous laisse répondre… :cool:
     
  7. Benjamin Moutou must respect Rastas like he respects Creoles

    Benjamin Moutou must respect Rastas like he respects Creoles

    [​IMG]
    Mauritian Rastas, descendants of slaves​

    While Creole is a European identity, Rastas are proud of their African roots and condemn the crimes committed by Babylon.

    The Mauritian government must also recognise the African belief system of Rastas just like it recognises the Indian Ahmadi belief system.

    M.R.S.
     
  8. boispignolet

    boispignolet Membre


    Ce sont tous les êtres humains qui doivent être respectés.
     
  9. Alleging I campaigned against Rastas, the thicko now says I am their spokesman

    Earlier, I was accused of leading a campaign against Rastas, a peaceful community I have mixed with for over 8 years in London East End, and with whom I appreciated reggae music.

    Now, I am accused of pretending to be the spokesman of Rastas ["Maintenant, Rafic se déclare porte-parole des rastas"].

    He is as thick as two planks, isn't he? When he flushes his dirty and stinking toilet, his favourite place, indeed, he does feel his head becomes empty because it is so full of crap.

    To his displeasure, I am not a créolophone like him. Unlike in slavery, the individual chooses which language to speak and write in freedom. On the other hand, the descendant of slave is free to preserve the slave language, but it cannot be imposed on everyone else, whether or not the term is used in common parlance. People often uses terms they do not understand, terms such as créolisme, communalisme, islamisme - many such terms were invented by racists.

    However, aside this loner, readers with knowledge, logic and common sense would understand why the question << How does a descendant of African slave become a Creole, creole being a European term? >> was put. Mind you, although a person is free to describe himself (herself) a descendant of slave, there is a problem with this expression as, similarly, Australians should be described descendants of convicts. If an African is made a slave and is freed, are his descendants descendants of slaves or Africans? People have freedom of expression and are entitled to pose such questions and debate such issues.

    In this sense, the Rastafari philosophy makes more sense as it is more logical and claims its African identity.

    The thicko is wrong in reducing the Rastafarian culture to the smoking of cannabis and in attacking Sadhus and Hindus in the process. He is so full of racism and hate.

    M.R.S
     
  10. boispignolet

    boispignolet Membre

    Rafic se concentre depuis quelques posts sur la matière fécale qu’il appelle dans la langue des anciens esclavagistes crap.

    Rafic, est devenu la Fée Cale des hôtes de ce forum !

    Rafic a écrit : « Earlier, I was accused of leading a campaign against Rastas, a peaceful community I have mixed with for over 8 years in London East End, and with whom I appreciated reggae music.”

    Je parie que dans quelques posts, il va écrire qu’il a aussi apprécié de fumer du gandia avec les Rastas de London East End !

    Rafic a écrit : « To his displeasure, I am not a créolophone like him. Unlike in slavery, the individual chooses which language to speak and write in freedom. On the other hand, the descendant of slave is free to preserve the slave language, but it cannot be imposed on everyone else, whether or not the term is used in common parlance. People often uses terms they do not understand, terms such as créolisme, communalisme, islamisme - many such terms were invented by racists.”

    Personne à Maurice ne veut imposer l’étude du créole! Il a été simplement demandé son enseignement en option dans les écoles, au même titre que pour d’autres dialectes comme le bhojpuri. Quelle malhonnêteté !

    Rafic a écrit : « To his displeasure, I am not a créolophone like him. Unlike in slavery, the individual chooses which language to speak and write in freedom. On the other hand, the descendant of slave is free to preserve the slave language, but it cannot be imposed on everyone else, whether or not the term is used in common parlance. People often uses terms they do not understand, terms such as créolisme, communalisme, islamisme - many such terms were invented by racists.”

    Je ne vous empêche pas de débattre, mais malheureusement votre posture sur ce forum confine au fanatisme. Vos écrits reflètent votre haine pour la langue créole et par la même occasion des créoles et tout ce qui s’y rapporte.

    Laissez les créoles être des créoles bons sangs ! Laissez faire ceux qui veulent utiliser ou apprendre cette langue. Ce qui fait le charme de ce pays c’est ce métissage de cultures. Que danse-t-on dans les hôtels ?

    Que cela découle de l’esclavage causé par la cupidité humaine c’est abjecte soit, mais faut-il ressasser un passé établi ? Il n’est pas possible de modifier le passé, même en se morfondant éternellement comme vous le faites.

    Vous semblez vivre bien à Londres et pourtant ce pays a un grand passé de colonisateur et d’esclavagiste. Vous vous accommodez bien de ce passé, il me semble !

    Faites donc des posts constructifs sur l’Ile Maurice et vous aurez certainement de nombreuses réactions intéressantes.

    Rafic a écrit : « The thicko is wrong in reducing the Rastafarian culture to the smoking of cannabis and in attacking Sadhus and Hindus in the process. He is so full of racism and hate.”

    Je réponds du “thickotac” que je n’ai jamais insulté qui que ce soit. Merci de citer mes propos insultants.

    JOYEUX NOËL RAFIC !
     
  11. Freedom of expression to debate issues, not to make personal attacks



    Freedom of expression to pose questions and debate issues and not make personal attacks


    << To his [Charles Boispignolet's] displeasure, I am not a créolophone like him. Unlike in slavery, the individual chooses which language to speak and write in freedom. On the other hand, the descendant of slave is free to preserve the slave language, but it cannot be imposed on everyone else, whether or not the term is used in common parlance. People often uses terms they do not understand, terms such as créolisme, communalisme, islamisme - many such terms were invented by racists.

    However, aside this loner, readers with knowledge, logic and common sense would understand why the question << How does a descendant of African slave become a Creole, creole being a European term? >> was put. Mind you, although a person is free to describe himself (herself) a descendant of slave, there is a problem with this expression as, similarly, Australians should be described descendants of convicts. If an African is made a slave and is freed, are his descendants descendants of slaves or Africans? People have freedom of expression and are entitled to pose such questions and debate such issues. >>


    << Alors que, malgré toute divergence d’idée dans certains cas, des milliers de lectrices et lecteurs s’informent à travers les ouvrages des auteurs sur ce forum et ailleurs, ce fauteur de trouble qui est incapable d’écrire un article publiable et dont les attaques personnelles sont rejetées par l’ensemble de la presse mauricienne, essaie constamment de saboter, sans succès, les ouvrages des autres en s’imposant à tout bout de champ.

    Ce loner qui cache son visage est obsédé avec les femmes des autres (comme la femme de Dev Virahsawmy) et qui passe son temps à copier des liens, à pervertir, mentir, insulter et inciter à la haine sur tous les postes d’autrui aurait un comportement quasi-maladif. Peut-être qu’il vit seul dans une chambre de bonne dans un immeuble à Paris et passe son temps à courir après les femmes des autres.

    À rappeler que, d’après les médias européens, tous les terroristes qui ont tué des enfants, comme adultes, dans les écoles aux USA étaient tous des « loners » et des « obsédés ». La préfecture parisienne devrait prendre bonne note. >>



    Rather than debating issues, the W.C. Pervert Charles Boispignolet makes personal attacks and drags peoples wives children and families, all in attempt to suppress freedom of expression. This is the classic strategy of a racist and a very sick man.

    M.R.S.
     
  12. boispignolet

    boispignolet Membre

    Vlà ti pas que Rafic nous fait un coup de Calgon, car je parle défavorablement de lui! :cry:

    Il post dans un journal une photo avec une légende dithyrambique mais il ne faut pas la critiquer.

    Rafic a écrit : « the individual chooses which language to speak and write in freedom.

    Mais c’est ce que je m’efforce depuis belle lurette de vous faire comprendre! :rolleyes:

    D’ailleurs, vous appliquez cela à la lettre, car vous avez choisi de ne pas parler le créole.

    Mais vous, ce que vous voulez c’est l’abandon pur et simple de la langue créole à Maurice, car elle est issue de l’esclavage.

    Rafic a écrit : « However, aside this loner, readers with knowledge, logic and common sense would understand why the question << How does a descendant of African slave become a Creole, creole being a European term?”

    Mon cher Rafic, les lecteurs s’en foutent de vos soi-disant questions sur ce sujet, car aucun membre de ce forum et d’ailleurs ne souhaite échanger avec vous.

    Mais comme vous êtes un individu borné, du moment que votre prose apparaît sur un forum, vous êtes content. Et en ce moment, votre prose est en rouge, car c’est Noël et vous avez les boules ! :mrgreen:

    Il est inutile de copier des informations que l’on trouve sur le web afin de les poster ici. Les lecteurs savent pertinemment bien où les trouver.

    Vous me situez dans la catégorie des terroristes maintenant ! M’autorisez-vous à faire la bombe ce soir ?

    Rafic, j’ai bien l’impression que l’on vous a volé votre sucette orthodontique lorsque vous étiez un petit bébé et que vous ne vous en êtes jamais remis.
     
  13. Confondre le Patois Mauricien avec le créole des esclaves

    Il ne faut pas confondre le Patois Mauricien avec le créole des esclaves


    << In her article « Construction et stratégies identitaires pour les Créoles » (le Mauricien 31/01/2000 and 01/02/2000), even Mrs Danielle Palmyre of the « Diocèse de Port-Louis » recognises that the term 'Créole' is associated with a panoply of pejorative and degrading terms which she describes as : « Crépus », « Créoles ti sévé », « mo noir », « zanimaux », « paresseux », « propension naturelle pour l'alcoolisme », « sentir mauvais », « culture et langue comme inférieurs ». >>

    Charles Boispignolet a écrit :
    << Bhikhari Thakur n’a pas repris en 2011 votre article ["Bhojpuri not comparable with Creole", l'Express 18th July 2010], car c’est vous qui l’avez posté comme pour Le Matinal >>


    Réponse :
    Espèce de vile menteur et puanteur! Vous parlez toujours en votre langue de votre sale w.c. BADBHOO!!



    M.R.S.
     
  14. boispignolet

    boispignolet Membre

    Il ne faut pas confondre le Patois Mauricien avec le créole des esclaves
    C’est évident, car depuis 1835 le créole a évolué mais pas Rafic.

    J’ai l’impression que la bête immonde est encore enfermée dans ses WC, assise sur la lunette de la cuvette et qu’elle déverse en continu son flot habituel de propos racistes et communautaristes.
    Heureusement, ses élucubrations n’ont que peu de chemin à parcourir pour finir là où elles méritent d’être…dans une fosse septique.
    Les quelques mots que vous avez retirés de leur contexte et semble-t-il d’un article de Danielle Palmyre seraient-ils ceux attribués par d’autres communautés à l’encontre des créoles et surtout entre jeunes dans les écoles ?
    Afin d’assurer votre crédibilité, merci de mettre le lien conduisant directement à l’article en question.
    Je vous conseille son livre très complet sur le sujet.

    Créoles, vous pouvez dormir tranquille, Rafic l’extrémiste de service est en train de prendre soin de la nation arc-en-ciel !
     

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